Project Title

Introduction
Amanda Ivey-Poulin
Sally Ride
Cynthia Romero
Magnetism
Danielle McGahee
Potential & Kinetic Energy
Darlene Florek
Physical and Chemical Changes
Katherine Rock
Watersheds
Kelly Grant
States of Matter: Suspension
Nicole LaVerde
Electricity
Wendy Sbalbi
The Solar System
Michelle Gore
States of Matter
Kathryn Girard
Energy
Carrie Healy
Gravity
Lucindy DeLuca
Fireworks
Kimberly Ayers
Sound Waves
Introduction by Professor Ruan

Many of the students in this class are elementary education majors. They need resources of good lessons, activities, and projects to build their future careers. This web site is the beggining of a virtual library of lesson plans and projects that can be widely shared among current Bay Path students and recent graduates. I have collected, and will continue to collect, many student projects and lesson plans in my course PHS-100. I believe that this web site wiil provide students with valuable resources and continuous support while making connections to our students and Bay Path community.

Click onto a link on the left to view the projects.

Guideline for Individual Project/Lesson Plan
PHS – 100 Physical Science for Non-Science Majors

Each student in the class of PHS – 100 is required to complete a self-study project. Every student is encouraged to study one particular topic in physical science (i.e. topics in physics, chemistry, geology, meteorology, or astronomy, etc.) and become an expert on that particular topic. Each student will present her project during the last Saturday class after the final exam.

Students who major in elementary education should prepare a 40 - 50 minutes lesson plan for their elementary science classes. Students need to:

  • Prepare a detailed lesson plan using the standard lesson plan format.
  • Include in your plan with these features: a) Intro/overview/agenda, b) importance or rationale, c) learning objectives/goals, d) an activator/motivator, e) principles/scientific laws related to the content, f) activities applying and reinforcing the principles to practices, and g) assessment/feedback.
  • Remember that activities are the essential part of learning for young children. Hands-on participations and experimental demonstrations are always powerful tools for teaching and learning science
  • Use technology as a tool to raise the quality of science education (i.e. Internet and website links, PowerPoint, Internet simulated experiment, etc.).

Students who are non-education majors should prepare a 30-minute presentation for their colleagues as an in-service session of professional development. Students need to:

  • Present a current scientific discovery, a controversial issue, a development of new technology, or an interesting biography of a famous scientist that are informative, educational, and interesting to audience.
  • Include in your presentation with these features: a) Intro/overview/agenda, b) importance/rationale, c) learning objectives/goals, d) an activator/motivator, e) principles/scientific laws related to the content, f) activities applying and reinforcing the principles to practices, and g) assessment/feedback.
  • Remember that activities and audience participations are always essential for your presentation, even with adult audience.
  • Use technology as a tool to enhance the quality of your presentation (i.e. Internet and website links, PowerPoint, Internet simulated experiment, etc.).

The lesson plan/presentation should be self-contained. Everything needed to teach the lesson or to present the session should be part of the project that they can be used by other teachers or presenters. The goal of this project is to build a virtual library of lesson plans and presentations that can be widely shared among educational professionals.

 
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